Peat-Fire Flame
K. MacLeod


Far away and o'er the moor,
Far away and o'er the moor,
Morar waits for a boat that saileth,
Far away down Lowland way,
I dream the dream I learned, lad,
By the light o' the peat-fire flame,
Light for love, for lilt o' grail-deeds,
By the light o' the peat-fire flame,
The light the hill-folk yearn for.

Far away, down Lowland way,
Far away, down Lowland way,
Grim's the toil, without tune or dream, lad,
All you need's a creel and love,
For the dream the heart can weave, lad
By the light o' the peat-fire flame,
Light for love, for lilt o' grail-deeds,
By the light o' the peat-fire flame,
The light the hill-folk yearn for.

Far away and o'er the moor,
Far away the tramp and tread,
Tune and laughter of all the heroes,
Pulls me onward o'er the trail
Of the dream my heart may weave, lad,
By the light o' the peat-fire flame,
Light for love, for lilt o' grail-deeds,
By the light o' the peat-fire flame,
The light the hill-folk yearn for.

The third last line in each verse is sometimes given as 'Light for love, for lit, for laughter'. This is described by Marjory Kennedy-Fraser as a tramping song and a companion to "The Road to the Isles". The tune was played on a chanter by Malcolm Johnson to Kenneth MacLeod, the Gaelic editor of "Songs of the Hebrides", who wrote the words given here. Even today many Scottish homes still burn peat as a way of heating the house.

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