Bonnie Wells O' Wearie
A. Maclagan and J. C. Grieve


Come let us climb Auld Arthur Seat,
When summer flowers are blooming;
When golden blooms and heather bells
Are a' the air perfuming.
When sweet May gowans deck the braes,
The hours flee fast fu' cheerie,
Where bonnie lasses bleach their claes
Beside the Wells o' Wearie.

The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
Come let us spend a summer day
Beside the Wells o' Wearie.

There Scotland's Queen in stormy times
Forgot her saddest story;
There brave Prince Charlie led his clans
To deeds o' martial glory.
Where Johnnie Cope wi' a' his men
Were scattered tapselteerie,
There Scotland's banner prodly waived
Beside the Wells o' Wearie.

The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
Come let us spend a summer day
Beside the Wells o' Wearie.

Then let us hail Auld Arthur Seat;
Like Scotland's Rampant Lion,
It towers a wonder of the world,
The wildest storms defying.
Wi' dauntless front neath summer skies
Or wintry blasts sae dreary,
It stands, in peace or war to guard
The bonnie Wells o' Wearie.

The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
Come let us spend a summer day
Beside the Wells o' Wearie.

The Wells o' Wearie are situated at the southern bend of Queen's Park in Edinburgh, not far from the foot of Arthur's Seat. The writer of the words was Alexander Maclagan who was born in Perth in 1811 and combined his work as a poet with that of a plumber. The melody was written by John Charles Grieve who was born in Edinburgh in 1842.

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