The Bonnie Lass O' Ballochmyle
R. Burns


Fair is the morn in flow'ry May, 
And sweet is night in autumn mild, 
When roving thro' the garden gay, 
Or wand'ring in the lonely wild; 
But woman nature's darling child 
There all her charms she does compile; 
E'en there her other works are foil'd 
E'en there her other works are foil'd 
By the bonnie lass o' Ballochmyle.

The bonnie lass o' Ballochmyle	
The bonnie lass! 
The bonnie, bonnie lass!
The bonnie lass o' Ballochmyle.

O had she been a country maid, 
And I the happy country swain, 
Tho' shelter'd in the lowest shed 
That ever rose on Scotland's plain! 
Thro' weary winter's wind and rain, 
With joy, with rapture, I would toil; 
And nightly to my bosom strain, 
And nightly to my bosom strain, 
The bonnie lass o' Ballochmyle.	

The bonnie lass o' Ballochmyle	
The bonnie lass! 
The bonnie, bonnie lass!
The bonnie lass o' Ballochmyle.

Ballochmyle house stands on the banks of the River Ayr. In the time of Robert Burns, the house was occupied by Sir Claude Alexander, whose sister inspired the song. In a letterto her, dated 18th November 1786, Burnes described in lyrical and even passionate terms, the extent of her effect upon him and thus how the song had come to be written. He never received a reply but in later years Miss Alexander freely acknowledged herself to be the lady in question and even had an arbour built on the spot where her path had crossed the poet's.

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