Loch Lomond
Anonymous


By yon bonnie banks, and by yon bonnie braes
Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomond
There me and my true love spent mony happy days
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomond.

Oh, ye'll tak' the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
And I'll be in Scotland before ye
But trouble it is there, and mony hearts are sair
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomond.

'Twas there that we parted in yon bonnie glen
On the steep, steep side o' Ben Lomond
Where in purple hue the Highland hills we view
And the moon glints out in the gloamin'.

Oh, ye'll tak' the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
And I'll be in Scotland before ye
But trouble it is there, and mony hearts are sair
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomond.

There the wild flowers spring and the wee birdies sing
And in sunshine the waters are sleepin'
But the broken heart it kens nae second spring again
Though resigned we may be while we're greetin'.

Oh, ye'll tak' the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
And I'll be in Scotland before ye
But trouble it is there, and mony hearts are sair
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomond.

Loch Lomond
Anonymous


By yon bonnie banks and by yon bonnie braes, 
Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomon'. 
Where me and my true love were ever wont to gae 
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomon'. 

O ye'll tak' the high road and I'll tak the low road,   
An' I'll be in Scotland afore ye; 
But me and my true love will never meet again 
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomon'. 
 
'Twas there that we parted in yon shady glen, 
On the steep, steep side o' Ben Lomon', 
Where in purple hue the Hieland hills we view, 
An' the moon comin' out in the gloamin'. 
 
O ye'll tak' the high road and I'll tak the low road,
An' I'll be in Scotland afore ye;
But me and my true love will never meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomon'. 
 
The wee birdies sing and the wild flow'rs spring, 
And in sunshine the waters are sleepin'; 
But the broken heart it kens nae second spring, 
Tho' the waefu' may cease frae their greetin'

O ye'll tak' the high road and I'll tak the low road, 
An' I'll be in Scotland afore ye; 
But me and my true love will never meet again 
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomon'.

Midi sequenced by Barry Taylor

Lady John Scott (1810-1900) and her husband picked up the first two verses and the melody 'from a poor boy in the streets of Edinburgh'. It is believed that the song was written by a young soldier to his sweetheart. Two soldiers of Bonnie Prince Charlie were captured in Carlisle after the abortive rising of 1745. One, who was to be executed, wrote the song, the other was released and took it back to Scotland to give to his colleagues sweetheart. According to Celtic belief, the low road refers to the path of his spirit back to Scotland, whilst the high road is either the sign of hope for which he sacrificed his life or the actual road back to Scotland over the high rugged hills. Hence, his spirit would return via the low road and be back in Scotland first.

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