The Bluebells Of Scotland
Mrs Grant of Laggan


Oh where, tell me where is your highland laddie gone?
Oh where, tell me where is your highland laddie gone?
He's gone with streaming banners where noble deeds are done
And it's oh! in my heart I wish him safe at home.

Oh where, tell me where did your highland laddie dwell?
Oh where, tell me where did your highland laddie dwell?
He dwelt in bonnie Scotland where bloom the sweet bluebells
And it's oh! in my heart I rue my laddie well.

Oh what, tell me what, does your Highland laddie wear?
Oh what, tell me what, does your Highland laddie wear?
A bonnet with a lofty plume, and on his breast a plaid
And it's oh, in my heart I lo'ed my Highland lad

Oh what, tell me what if your highland lad be slain?
Oh what, tell me what if your highland lad be slain?
Oh no, true love will be his guide and bring him safe again
For it's oh! my heart would break if my highland lad were slain.

Suppose, ah suppose, that some cruel, cruel wound
Should peirce your Highland laddie and all your hopes confound:
The pipe would play a cheering march the banners round him fly,
And for his kind and county dear with pleasure would he die.

The Bluebells Of Scotland
Anonymous


Oh where and oh where is your Highland laddie gone?
Oh where and oh where is your Highland laddie gone?
He's gone to fight the foe for King George on the throne,
And it's oh! in my heart I wish him safe at home.

Oh where and oh where did your Highland laddie dwell?
Oh where and oh where did your Highland laddie dwell?
He dwelt in merry Scotland at the Sign of the Blue Bell
And it's oh! in my heart I love my laddie well.

Oh how, tell me how, is your Highland laddie clad?
Oh how, tell me how, is your Highland laddie clad?
His bonnet's of the Saxon green, his waistcoat of the plaid
And it's oh, in my heart that I love that Highland lad

Suppose, oh suppose that your Highland lad should die!
Suppose, oh suppose that your Highland lad should die!
The bagpipes should play o'er him, and I'd lay me down and cry; 
But it's oh! in  my heart that I feel he will not die.





Midi sequenced by Barry Taylor

Usually the tune is described as being traditional and of anonymous origin. It may, however be of English origin as it appears in "The North Country Chorister" before being known in Scotland. It was also sung around 1801 by a Mrs Jordan (an Irishwoman) at the Drury Lane Theatre in London under the title of "Blue Bell of Tothill Fields". In that version the focus of the song is a convict transported to Botany Bay. The present words are by Mrs. Grant of Laggan. There are a number of sets of words to this tune. With the exception of the last verse, (first version) one of these are probably close to what Mrs. Grant wrote in 1799 on the departure for Holland of the Marquess of Huntly with his regiment. However, the fifth verse (first version) looks as if it was written more to persuade soldiers that it's quite noble to die for one's country, rather than the concern expressed in the rest of the song.

TOP OF PAGE

BACK

MAIN PAGE